Some northern Europe saltwater snails (and perhaps a slug)

Marine snails in this section.

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Postby Donya on Tue Nov 27, 2007 11:55 pm

WOW! Great find on those pages. That last page has the exact ID on it...my jellies must be a Cladonema species. :o A better picture than any I could get: http://www.biology.tohoku.ac.jp/lab-www ... donema.jpg They look exactly like that, branched tentacles and all.

Do you think the medusas are grown up enough to reproduce?


The ones I have currently probably aren't yet since they're not full-sized yet, but they are the 3rd generation it seems.
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Postby Annie Anderson on Wed Nov 28, 2007 2:17 am

Those are beautiful Donya! They look like fireworks :D
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Postby Pollux on Wed Nov 28, 2007 8:16 am

yeah they do
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Postby Blötdjur on Wed Jan 02, 2008 9:09 am

This is a Common Periwinkle habitat on the Swedish west coast. Perhaps some Rough Periwinkles too.
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Postby Pollux on Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:58 am

look at them all! :D some nice algae too. i saw this documentary the other day on tv that said that their slime has fertiliser in it to help grow the algae they eat.
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Postby Blötdjur on Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:05 am

That's interesting! I would like to see that documentary. I had read that they can be seen in eachothers slime tracks eating stuff that is stuck, it's like laying a net of capture :-):
"Periwinkles are often seen grazing in mucus tracks after other snails. The reason is believed to be that extra good food is found there. The mucus itself contains nutritious substances, that has furthermore been enriched by the addition of organic material being stuck in the mucus, and of the rich microflora that find this comfortable environment congenial."
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Postby Blötdjur on Thu Jan 10, 2008 4:05 am

Now I haven't seen the Netted Dog Whelks in a long time. It has even been a some time since I saw the suspected young Common Periwinkle. But maybe there will be more :-)

I suspect I might have two bristleworms, if the animal with tentacles burying in the sand is one. One is sitting at the base of the Bladder Wrack, waiting. I have also found the shell of the largest Flat Periwinkle right below where that bristleworm used to live, the only empty shell I have found.

I am not too sad at the disappearing snails and slugs. If the bristleworm ate them, at least it's a living ecosystem and the bristleworm is fed.

The Common Periwinkles are supposed to be able to be 4 cm. (about 1 3/5 inches), something I haven't seen in Sweden. Perhaps, since aquarium keeping (well done of course!) seems to possibly be benificial to these, maybe they can get pretty big here. They are growing well. They are like little tough Apple Snails, but good at eating algae :-)
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Postby Blötdjur on Thu Jan 10, 2008 4:33 am

4 cm. was from a book, but I found online that their maximum shell height is 52 mm. (more than 2 inches I think), wow :-)
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Postby Helikulo on Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm

I really enjoy reading about your progress with this tank as I hope to do the same thing in a few months. More updates please if you can!

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Postby Blötdjur on Thu Jan 17, 2008 1:02 pm

Nice to hear someone enjoys reading this! I happily write more about this! And of course I would like to hear about and see your tank if you do the same (I would like to see everybodys saltwater tanks :-))!

If you possibly will use a bigger tank, I think it would be interesting to make a paludarium, and you could have periwinkles and sea slaters (Ligia oceanica (link), like up to about 3 cm. (about 1 1/5 inches) big woodlice (called Grey-Sows in swedish :-))) on the land part :-)

I didn't see any coralline algae (a kind of algae with lime) when I collected the material, but now it's been growing for a long time and I have little pink spots.

The Bladder Wrack is growing OK. Perhaps there are growth spurts when I increase the lighting, until the nutrients have decreased. Perhaps I should put in things that produce nutrients in the tank.

I have carefully put in small pieces of shrimp and catfish tablets very seldomly, and they have been eaten.

I am also thinking about increasing the silicate to increase the diatoms. Common Periwinkles eat diatoms.

Also, I have been to my nearby brackish sea (the Baltic Sea, or the East-Lake/-Sea as we call it) and collected some things, but its currently in a bucket with light and air stone :-) The nerite Theodoxus fluviatilis (see my other thread here (link)) is perhaps the dominant snail in the Baltic Sea near the coast, although there are many small snails in the sand. Had I got one more little tank I would have one for each sea...
Last edited by Blötdjur on Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby darktoad on Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:54 pm

Keep up the information about your excursions and subsequent growth in your tank. Its very interesting. I have never done a marine tank but you are making it sound very enticing. If I ever start one it will be to try and get as much variety of life as possible.
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Postby Blötdjur on Mon Jan 21, 2008 3:14 pm

Nice with the interest here!

Even if you collect seemingly uninhabited material, chances are your tank will be crawling with lots of different animals!

Here is my thread about my brackish Baltic Sea tank which will hopefully exist:
http://www.applesnail.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=157715
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Postby Blötdjur on Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:06 am

I put in 5 drops of my diluted water glass solution to increase the silicate and thereby the diatoms. I haven't counted very exact on it but I figured it can't be too much :-)

When it dripped in the water it turned a bit cloudy.
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Postby Blötdjur on Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:48 pm

Littorina littorea, Common Periwinkle:
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Postby Blötdjur on Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:08 pm

Coralline algae, and "red slime algae" :-):
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