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Flapple killers

PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 11:53 pm
by rpilla001
As it turns out the South Florida Water Management District does not care about my canal. They see excessive plant material as a hazard to water control in the drainage canals. They have been spending the last month systematically destroying the ecosystem that has taken root in these canals.

I do understand the problem and the need to keep these waterways open. It is a shame that the flapples and other creatures trying to get a foot hold are doomed.

My canal looking North. The pile of dead lemon bacopa on the left is twice as high today as it was last week when I took this photo

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Snail Killing Machines

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The Aftermath

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 2:04 am
by Pollux
:cry: are they worried the canals will flood if they get 'clogged'? arnt the bacopa native?

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 3:52 am
by rpilla001
When tropical storms or hurricanes come the flood gates are opened so the inland areas do not flood. The water near the coast must drain to the coast. If the spillways get clogged with vegetation then everything will flood and the canal system will be a total loss.

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 5:14 am
by Pollux
are there any natural waterways for the flapples?

PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:14 pm
by rpilla001
I am sure there is but I have not come across them. Everything in the urban center is very controlled.

PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:16 pm
by rpilla001
The killing continues as snail killers are hard at work. The steel triangular jaws are dropped into the water and scrapes along the bottom to remove vegitation. Then it is scooped up and dumped on the shore thus depleting the food source for many of the snails as well as destroying their habitat.

You Batstards, You Killed Snaily!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2008 10:31 am
by SnailerD
Is there any way you can "borrow" more Flapples from the canal? To keep them going? I think it's terrible when the agencies don't see the big picture. Those really are some kind of machines, too. I don't think I would be able to sit back and let the snails all be taken out. I'd be trying to salvage them - or the eggs, or something. Isn't there anyone you can talk to, in hopes of making them understand? I'm sorry they're destroying the Flapple habitat and "your" canal. :angry: :(

PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:39 pm
by rpilla001
For better or worse the clearing of the canals must be done. The primary purpose of the canals is the prevention of inland flooding. Prevention of flooding cannot be done unless the flood gates oporate properly and water can flow freely.

Heavy plant growth in the canal can and will impede this process. They can even clog the waterways. So this excercise must be done every couple of years in order to assure the function of the system.

Any species of plants or animals that happen to take hold in these systems is purely coincidental. The snails mosty likely came along on the legs of a bird or were carried downstream from a large boby of water.

This mini ecosystem is expendable at the cost of preventing billions of dollars in flood damages from heavy rains brought on by tropical storm systems.

I am sure the snails will survive this. There is more than enough plant material left for this small population to survive on. This will also make them easier to find.

Re: Flapple killers

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:30 pm
by Bottomfeeder
I got an idea, build an outdoor/indoor pond and set out a bunch of crab traps. Also try a cast net, seine net, dipnet, and even a trawl net if you can aquire a canoe, etc and temporarily hold the critters you catch

Re: Flapple killers

PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2008 4:19 am
by rpilla001
Good idea with a crab trap but these waterwys are managed by the South Florida Water Management District. They would get a bit pissed if I put in a bunch of traps. The Florida Apple snail is no where near endangered and this population is purely artificial.

I have noticed that the lemon bacopa has already grown back. I will see next spring what survived.

The bigger problem is the constant trimming of shoreline grasses. This population does not ahve mush of a chance without shoreline growth to lay eggs. They are at a constant struggle generate the next generations.